An examination of the novel wuthering heights by emily bronte

Plot[ edit ] Opening chapters 1 to 3 [ edit ] InLockwooda wealthy young man from the South of England, who is seeking peace and recuperation, rents Thrushcross Grange in Yorkshire. He visits his landlordHeathcliffwho lives in a remote moorland farmhouse, Wuthering Heights.

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work.

An examination of the novel wuthering heights by emily bronte

The book is actually structured around two parallel love stories, the first half of the novel centering on the love between Catherine and Heathcliff, while the less dramatic second half features the developing love between young Catherine and Hareton.

In contrast to the first, the latter tale ends happily, restoring peace and order to Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. Early in the novel Hareton seems irredeemably brutal, savage, and illiterate, but over time he becomes a loyal friend to young Catherine and learns to read.

When young Catherine first meets Hareton he seems completely alien to her world, yet her attitude also evolves from contempt to love. In choosing to marry Edgar, Catherine seeks a more genteel life, but she refuses to adapt to her role as wife, either by sacrificing Heathcliff or embracing Edgar.

In Chapter XII she suggests to Nelly that the years since she was twelve years old and her father died have been like a blank to her, and she longs to return to the moors of her childhood. Heathcliff, for his part, possesses a seemingly superhuman ability to maintain the same attitude and to nurse the same grudges over many years.

Their love denies difference, and is strangely asexual. The two do not kiss in dark corners or arrange secret trysts, as adulterers do. Ultimately, Wuthering Heights presents a vision of life as a process of change, and celebrates this process over and against the romantic intensity of its principal characters.

The Precariousness of Social Class As members of the gentry, the Earnshaws and the Lintons occupy a somewhat precarious place within the hierarchy of late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century British society.

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At the top of British society was the royalty, followed by the aristocracy, then by the gentry, and then by the lower classes, who made up the vast majority of the population. Although the gentry, or upper middle class, possessed servants and often large estates, they held a nonetheless fragile social position.

The social status of aristocrats was a formal and settled matter, because aristocrats had official titles. Members of the gentry, however, held no titles, and their status was thus subject to change.

Related Questions

A man might see himself as a gentleman but find, to his embarrassment, that his neighbors did not share this view. The Lintons are relatively firm in their gentry status but nonetheless take great pains to prove this status through their behaviors.

An examination of the novel wuthering heights by emily bronte

The Earnshaws, on the other hand, rest on much shakier ground socially.Emily Bronte's "Wuthering Heights" ranks high on the list of major works of English literature for its powerful imagery, complex structure, and even itss ambiguity. Wuthering Heights opens with Lockwood, a tenant of Heathcliff's, visiting the home of his landlord.A subsequent visit to Wuthering Heights yields an accident and a curious supernatural encounter, which pique Lockwood's curiosity.

Emily Bronte's "Wuthering Heights" ranks high on the list of major works of English literature for its powerful imagery, complex structure, and even itss ambiguity. This novel . Although, Wuthering Heights is said to be the most imaginative and poetic of all the Bronte's novels, Emily's book was not as popular as her older sister, Charlotte's, .

- Wuthering Heights, written by Emily Bronte, has pages. The genre of Wuthering Heights is realistic fiction, and it is a romantic novel.

The book is available in the school library, but it was bought at Barnes and Nobles. Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte This eBook is designed and published by Planet PDF. For more free Wuthering Heights is the name of Mr. Heathcliff’s dwelling.

‘Wuthering’ being a significant provincial adjective, descriptive of the atmospheric tumult to which its station is exposed in stormy weather. Pure, bracing.

Why is "Wuthering Heights" on the A.P. exam?Emily Bronte, author | eNotes